Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty (SLT)

SLT (selective laser trabeculoplasty) is a highly effective laser therapy for the treatment of glaucoma. A repeatable, non-invasive treatment, SLT uses short pulses of relatively low-energy, 532nm light to selectively target and irradiate the pigmented (melanin) cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM) to stimulate a process of cellular regeneration. As the normal function of the TM is restored, IOP is reduced. This process occurs differently from patient to patient, but typically takes place within one week following treatment.

SLT is a highly effective first-line therapy. It is also effective as adjunct therapy with drugs, and as alternative therapy when drugs or surgery fail. Most importantly, SLT enables you to take control of your patients’ glaucoma treatment without the compliance issues and side effects associated with drug therapy.

SLT works by a process known as selective photothermolysis, which refers to the absorption of energy by a chromophore in a period of time below its thermal relaxation time (TRT), or the amount of time it takes for the heat absorbed during a laser pulse to dissipate. Because the short, three-nanosecond pulse duration of SLT is well below the one-microsecond TRT of TM tissue, heat does not disseminate outside the affected cell and the TM architecture is preserved.

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ABiC

ABiC™ is a new, comprehensive MIGS procedure. Performed via a self-sealing, clear corneal incision, ABiC™ conserves the clinically proven benefits of 360-degree viscodilation of Schlemm’s canal provided by traditional Canaloplasty, but with the speed and ease of implementation of an MIGS procedure. Unlike other currently available MIGS procedures, however, ABiC™ preserves tissue and does not require permanent placement of an implant in the eye. It has also been shown to be effective as both a stand-alone procedure and as a combined procedure performed in conjunction with cataract surgery.

The most defining aspect of ABiC™ is its comprehensive approach. To date, ABiC™ is the only MIGS procedure that successfully and comprehensively addresses all aspects of potential outflow resistance. Whereas other MIGS procedures treat only one aspect of aqueous outflow, ABiC™ comprehensively accesses, catheterizes, and viscodilates the trabecular meshwork, Schlemm’s canal, and importantly, the distal outflow system, beginning with the collector channels.

Another hallmark of ABiC™ is that it does not involve a permanent implant or stent. Not only does this ensure a more simplified post-operative course, along with a reduced risk of possible complications, it is also well accepted by patients.

Canaloplasty

Canaloplasty is a highly effective surgical technique for the treatment of open-angle glaucoma. Minimally invasive, it uses breakthrough microcatheter technology to restore the function of the eye’s natural outflow system without the need for a filtering bleb – offering an unprecedented level of efficacy and safety in the surgical treatment of glaucoma. As an added benefit, Canaloplasty can be used in conjunction with existing drug based glaucoma treatments, after laser or other types of incisional surgery and does not preclude or affect the outcome of future surgery.

Ab-Externo Canaloplasty

With over 60,000 procedures performed to date, clinical studies have shown that Canaloplasty provides an improved safety profile with infrequent intra-operative and post-operative complications and does not result in bleb-related issues compared to traditional glaucoma surgery, such as trabeculectomy. During the procedure, the trabecular meshwork plates are stretched by a suture, which is tied and left in situ in Schlemm’s canal, also ensuring that the canal stays open. The canal itself is dilated over 360 degrees to more than 250 microns in diameter, which helps to pop open any previously obstructed collector channel ostia and restore the natural outflow pathways.

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Laser Floater Removal

Also known as floater laser treatment or laser floater removal, laser vitreolysis is a highly effective outpatient-based procedure that can eliminate the visual disturbance caused by vitreous strands and opacities, commonly referred to as floaters.

Virtually every individual has experienced or will experience the visual shadows caused by “floaters” during their lifetime. For most, this event is a minor and short-lived inconvenience, but for a select few, it can become a disabling condition. Clinical studies have shown laser vitreolysis to be a highly effective and safe treatment in the majority of patients with symptomatic floaters.

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Retinal Rejuvenation

A non-thermal laser therapy, Retinal Rejuvenation Therapy (2RT™) stimulates a natural, biological healing response in the eye and has demonstrated potential as an intervention and positively influencing early Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). Clinical studies have also shown 2RT™ to be an effective treatment for Clinically Significant Macular Edema (CSME).

Clinical and scientific studies have demonstrated the ability of 2RT™ to improve retinal function and to halt or delay the degenerative processes that cause some retinal diseases. Specifically, 2RT™ has been shown to reduce the area and volume of drusen from a baseline of 5% or more, and to deliver a functional improvement in some high-risk early AMD patients.

Unlike conventional retinal laser therapy, which can cause permanent collateral damage to the sensitive structures of the eye, 2RT™ protects the retina from thermal damage. It also offers the potential to apply treatment earlier in the disease process with the aim of slowing retinal degeneration, thereby eliminating or delaying the risk of vision-threatening complications associated with the late-stage of retinal disease.