Image Gallery:

1. Melanoma – Choroid

10MHz Posterior Segment B-Scan: Extraocular local recurrence adjacent to the optic nerve following plaque radiotherapy of a medial choroidal melanoma in the right eye.

Images courtesy of Bertil Damato, PhD, FRCOphth, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, United Kingdom.

2. Melanoma – Inferonasal

10MHz Posterior Segment B-Scan: Inferonasal melanoma in the left eye measuring 15.7 by 9.5 by 5.2 mm extending to pars plana.

Images courtesy of Bertil Damato, PhD, FRCOphth, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, United Kingdom.

3. Melanoma – Inferotemporal Ciliary Body

10MHz Posterior Segment B-Scan: A left inferotemporal ciliary body melanoma measuring 13.5 x 11.4 x 5.5mm. (Note: Ciliary body melanomas can have cystic spaces or pseudocystic spaces if there are areas of necrosis or amelanotic melanoma.)

Image courtesy of Bertil Damato, PhD, FRCOphth, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, United Kingdom.

4. Melanoma – Ciliary Body

10MHz Posterior Segment B-Scan: Left ciliary body melanoma with cystic spaces as per case study 3.

Images courtesy of Bertil Damato, PhD, FRCOphth, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, United Kingdom.

5. Melanoma – Choroid, Iris and Anterior Chamber

10MHz Posterior Segment B-Scan: A very atypical melanoma extending from choroid through iris into anterior chamber and showing necrosis.

Images courtesy of Bertil Damato, PhD, FRCOphth, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, United Kingdom.

6. Melanoma – Iris

10MHz Posterior Segment B-Scan: Temporal iris melanoma.

Images courtesy of Bertil Damato, PhD, FRCOphth, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, United Kingdom.

7. RPE/Choroidal Detachment

10MHz Posterior Segment B-Scan: Eccentric disciform lesion with RPE/choroidal detachment.

Image courtesy of Bertil Damato, PhD, FRCOphth, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, United Kingdom.

Trabeculectomy

A transverse scan of a trabeculectomy site shows the lacking of the sclera and of the iris (iridectomy). Peripheral iris iridectomy touch the sclera such as a synechia. To the left of the scan, three transverse ciliary processes are evident. The conjunctival bleb over the trabeculectomy site shows a low level of reflectivity, indicating positive post-surgery function.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Cataract

The zonula, an anterior lens opacity (possibly post-traumatic cataract) and an iris-cornea synechia with angle closure on the left, are visible.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

IOL

A subluxated IOL behind the pupil is visible. It is probably located in the bag, despite the fact that the loops are not visible.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Iris-Ciliary Body Cysts

A transverse scan shows two iris-ciliary body junction cysts.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Iris-Ciliary Body Cysts

A longitudinal scan shows one of these two cysts.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Endophthalmitis

Anterior chamber membranes close to the cornea are visible. Small, reflective dots are present in the aqueous. A low reflective structure (hypopion) is present in the angle. In addition, a fibrous membrane is present across the pupil, obscuring the lens. A low reflective structure is also noted in the posterior chamber.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Ex-PRESS Shunt in Uveitic Glaucoma

The outer edge of the Ex-PRESS shunt is visible with a back-scattering effect. The scleral flap is elevated with a hypoechoic space under the flap. The angle is open. The patient is pseudophakic (the artefact of the loop is visible with a small back-scattering).

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Ex-PRESS Shunt in Uveitic Glaucoma

The Ex-PRESS shunt is completely visible. The back-scattering effect, which is caused by the presence of a metallic material, obscures part of the iris. The shunt is well positioned.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Ex-PRESS Shunt in Uveitic Glaucoma

The inner edge of the Ex-PRESS shunt is visible without any contact with either the endothelium or the iris.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Ahmed Glaucoma Valve

Transverse scans show the tube of the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve positioned under the sclera and in the anterior chamber (with a shadow effect that covers the iris) respectively.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Ahmed Glaucoma Valve

Transverse scans show the tube of the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve positioned under the sclera and in the anterior chamber (with a shadow effect that covers the iris) respectively.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Ahmed Glaucoma Valve

The plate of the valve is visible with a shadow effect. It is impossible to recognize the valve mechanism by ultrasound.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Angle Measurement

The Eye Cubed™ enables biometric measurements of the anatomical structures of the eye. In order to obtain an accurate measurement, the tip of the caliper (the point of the triangle, as shown in the scan) must be located at the level of the scleral spur.

Image courtesy of Michele Figus, MD PhD, Chiara Posarelli, MD, and Marco Nardi, MD, University of Pisa, Italy.

Crystalens

Evaluating the effects of the IOL haptics on the anterior chamber angle aperture and the clinical performance of a Crystalens accommodating IOL – horizontal axial scan parallel to haptics, shown by arrows.

Image courtesy of Ioannis Pallikaris, MD, IVO-UOC, Crete, Greece.

Crystalens

Evaluating the effects of the IOL haptics on the anterior chamber angle aperture and the clinical performance of a Crystalens accommodating IOL – vertical axial scan.

Image courtesy of Ioannis Pallikaris, MD, IVO-UOC, Crete, Greece.

Decentered Posterior Chamber Lens

40MHz imaging can help understand refractive errors due to the incorrect position of an implantable contact lens (ICL).

Image courtesy of Ioannis Pallikaris, MD, IVO-UOC, Crete, Greece.

Decentered Posterior Chamber Lens

Another example of ICL not positioned in the visual axis.

Image courtesy of Ioannis Pallikaris, MD, IVO-UOC, Crete, Greece.

Video Gallery:

Ophthalmic Ultrasound in Clinical Practice – Video Interview
 with Yale Fisher, MD

Even in an era of highly advanced OCT imaging, ultrasound remains one of the
most fundamental diagnostic tools in ophthalmology. In this interview, ultrasound expert Dr. Yale Fisher, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Florida, addresses the fundamentals of ophthalmic ultrasound.

Ophthlamic Ultrasound: Finding the Problem Behind the Problem – Video Interview with
 Andrzej Dmitriew, MD

Detection of disorders like posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in opaque ocular media is easily achieved with B-Scan ultrasound. To learn more, watch the video interview with ultrasound expert and Eye Cubed™ user Dr. Dmitriew, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poland.